Eye Diseases

1/7/2016

I think it’s nice that prospective patients are open, curious and investigative when considering acupuncture, and credit should be given for considering it as a viable, potential option.

If you feel that your specific health condition requires or demands a deeper measure of expertise (or if that is your initial preference), feel free to continue reading below.

*  Keen Diagnostic Skill
It was interesting to see Dr. Li perform medical face reading (fading diagnostic method), a traditional, authentic component of Chinese medicine (obvious ones being pulse and tongue diagnosis).  Though I came in highly concerned about an abnormal, continuous right eye twitch, she made some inquisitive, passing comments about my acne scars, and the veins on my temples (didn’t notice myself) which she said indicated a history of headaches.  Though I don’t know the clinical significance or relevancy of these observations, the last part was true.

*  Extensive Point Selection
Most acupuncturists I visited for my eye condition placed needles in the arm/leg/face area (as did Dr. Li).  But Dr. Li was the first who seemed confident enough to insert needles around my eye socket in the localized, troubled area (yes, around my eyes).  Additional visits included needles inserted around my stomach area as well. Two weeks later, Dr Li was finally able to stop the odd, uncomfortable right eye twitch that the previous acupuncturists couldn’t carry out.  I can’t explain (and don’t know) how/why the results were different, but just that the unusual problem got fixed and taken care of.

*  In-depth Training & Seasoned Experience
The general public may not be acutely aware of the difference in training a U.S. acupuncturist receives relative to one in China.  While a completion of a 3/4-year U.S. acupuncture program (3,300 + hours) and passage of a national/state licensing exam would suffice to put up a shingle, the rigorous and extensive training one receives in China shouldn’t be overlooked (5,000+ hours, 5 years, study of both Chinese and Western medicine as they are referred to as Chinese medical doctors, additional 3-4 years post-graduate residency training).

In addition to the extensive education that Dr. Li received in China, its nice knowing she extended her post graduate training in both Chinese (Samra University) and Western (UCLA, USC, Cedar-Sinai Hospital) medicine here in the States.  Being able to articulate an acupuncture treatment through the lens of Western medical eyes, and to be flexible enough to navigate through two medical worlds to offer specialized knowledge and recommendations, is a rare luxury that many acupuncturists cannot provide and offer to their patients.

In the end, while there are other acupuncturists in the Valley who may realize a competent outcome with their patients, if you truly and genuinely feel that your health is really worth it, remember to keep Dr. Li on your short list.
James M. Encino, CA

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